Rest in Peace Pierre Cardin

French couturier Pierre Cardin died at the age of 98 on December 29, 2020 in Paris. He became famous for his 1960s-era avant-garde and Space Age looks, pioneering fashion ready-to-wear and the fashion licensing system. He sold everything from cars, perfume to food with his name and maintained that he built his business empire without ever asking a bank for a loan. This made him rich but also diminished his brand’s reputation at the same time.

In 1995, quotes from WWD included «Pierre Cardin—he has sold his name for toilet paper. At what point do you lose your identity?». However, the Cardin name was still very profitable, although the indiscriminate licensing approach was considered a failure. All these things that we know today, Armani hotels, Cartier chocolate, Dior Vespas, Gucci sunglasses is based on the imagination of Cardin. He was a marketing genius and saw this endless merchandising potential at a very early stage.

A scandal: He presented his first ready-to-wear collection for women in 1959 at Printemps departments store in Paris.

Spanning a 60-year career, Cardin was the first designer to sell clothes collections in department stores in the late 1950s. «It’s all the same to me whether I am doing sleeves for dresses or table legs,» a telling quote on his website once read. His competitors criticized him for destroying the notion of luxury which didn’t affect Cardin at all.

Dior’s famous New Look success created by Christian Dior and Pierre Cardin.

Born Pietro Cardin on July 2, 1922 near Venice to French parents of Italian descent, he was educated in the not-so-glamorous French city of Saint Etienne. From an early age, he was interested in dressmaking, starting work at age 14 as an apprentice even though his father wanted him to become an architect. He moved to Paris in 1945, where he studied architecture and worked with the fashion houses of Paquin and Elsa Schiaparelli. A year later, he joined the then-unknown Christian Dior who rose to fame with his 1947 New Look collection.

The famous bubble dress in 1954.

In 1950, he founded his own fashion house and only four years later, he introduced the iconic «bubble dress», a short-skirted, bubble-shaped dress made by bias-cutting over a stiffened base. He was the first couturier to turn to Japan as a high fashion market when he travelled there in 1957. That same year, he was expelled from the Chambre Syndicale for launching a ready-to-wear collection for the Printemps department store as the first couturier in Paris to do as such, but was soon reinstated. In 1966, he resigned himself and began showing his collections in his own venue, the «Espace Cardin» (opened 1971) in Paris, formerly the «Théâtre des Ambassadeurs».

Pierre Cardin in 1970 in front of the Espace Cardin.

He also blazed a trail outside France long before other fashion multinationals in search of new markets. In 1979, he went to China to presented a collection when it was still largely closed to the outside world. And only two years after the Berlin Wall came down, in 1991, he staged a fashion show in Red Square in Moscow before 200,000 people, a first in Russian history.

In 1975, Cardin opened his first furniture boutique on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré. His furniture designs were highly inspired by his fashion designs. In both 1977 and 1979, he was awarded the Cartier Golden Thimble by French haute couture for the most creative collection of the season.

In 1974 he became the first couturier to be on the Time magazine’s cover. He was 52 at that time.

In 1975, Cardin opened his first furniture boutique on the Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré. His furniture designs were highly inspired by his fashion designs. In both 1977 and 1979, he was awarded the Cartier Golden Thimble by French haute couture for the most creative collection of the season.

Maxim’s restaurants are part of Cardin’s portfolio.

In 1981 Cardin bought Maxim’s restaurants in 1981 and soon opened branches in New York, London, and Beijing. A chain of Maxim’s Hotels (Palm Springs, California, 1986) were included in the assets. He also licensed a wide range of food products under that name.

Palais des Bulles

Like many other designers today, Cardin decided in 1994 to show his collection only to a small circle of selected clients and journalists. After a break of 15 years, he showed a new collection to a group of 150 journalists at his bubble home in Cannes, the so-called Palais des Bulles, woven into the cliffs on one of the most exclusive strips of the French riviera.

Pierre Cardin and Pierre Courtial in February 2020

For his latest venture in February this year he teamed up with Pierre Courtial, 27, who unveiled a collection at Cardin’s studio on Paris’s chic Rue Saint-Honore, with pieces that echoed some of the veteran designer’s geometrical aesthetics.

Pierre Cardin in 1950

«I’ve always tried to be different, to be myself,» Cardin told Reuters. «Whether people like it or not, that’s not what matters.» He also defended his zeal for licensing in an interview with the Wall Street Journal: «I don’t want to end up like Balenciaga and die without a nickel – then, 20 years after I’m dead, see others make a fortune from my name.»

Rest in Peace Pierre Cardin!

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Pierre Cardin

For All Senses

On Monday evening, I was invited to a unique sensory experience by two famous Maisons, Christian Dior and Moët & Chandon. Both have united to create a new temporary concept, dedicated to the perfect olfactory pleasure at the ONYX Bar of Senses at Park Hyatt Zurich. Imagine, perfume that you can drink. Combining the savoir-faire of the perfumers and the cellar masters, cocktail lovers can enjoy an exclusive and individually prepared selection created by Hercules Tsibis, Bar Manager and Master Mixologist at the ONYX Bar.

Practicing social distancing: Hercules Tsibis with me

He developed six signature cocktails inspired by six exclusive fragrances of Maison Christian Dior, that harmonize perfectly with the aromas of the Moët & Chandon champagne Impérial Brut and Rosé. With the creative freedom of both houses, Hercules and his team created also six «essences», which enable a more intense version of the cocktails based on the principle of culinary reduction. Mixed with Moët & Chandon champagne, these «essences» offer a journey of taste.

Named after six beautiful scents by Maison Christian Dior that were chosen for their olfactory diversity, you can enjoy «La Colle Noire», «Rouge Trafalgar», «Bois d’Argent», «Gris Dior», «Spice Blend» and «Rose Kabuki». The menu offers two separate variations for each signature cocktail: a cocktail and an «essence».

«Essences» with miniature fragrances

Cocktail, accompanied by amuse-bouche and miniature of the fragrance CHF 28.50
«Essence», accompanied by an amuse bouche and miniature of the fragrance CHF 19.50

With beautiful Christa Rigozzi at the event last Monday.

Let yourself be enchanted by this experience, which consists of the play of colors, a bouquet of aromas and the extraordinary variety of perfumes. For this sensual sensory journey, head chef Tarik Lange created an amuse bouche that perfectly complements and completes your selection.

Filming the live talk between…

… Kiki Mäder, Tarik Lange and Stephen Ansell, GM Park Hyatt Hotel Zurich (from left to right).

You can enjoy it only for a limited amount of time, starting today until November 28, 2020 at the ONYX Bar of Senses at Park Hyatt Zurich.

LoL, Sandra

My favorite cocktail: Rose Kabuki

Photos: © David Biedert Photography

Vespa 946 Christian Dior

Here comes the coolest collaboration of this summer. Dior joins forces with Vespa to create an exclusive scooter and a range of matching accessories, celebrating the sunny spirit and art of living of the two houses that were founded in the same year, in 1946.

Out of this passionate dialogue, the Vespa 946 Christian Dior scooter comes to life, its monohull architecture and subtle graphic lines paying tribute to the heritage of the two brands. A symbol of refinement, this object of desire reflects their shared commitment to the excellence of savoir-faire and virtuoso art of detail.

A contemporary version of the iconic Vespa 946 – presented in 2012 in Milan and recognized for its elegant, streamlined curves and technological innovation – the new model was designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri, Creative Director of Dior women’s collections. The scooter is made in Italy, adhering to the exacting standards, commitment and precision of a couture atelier.

Echoing the design of the saddle, a top case patterned with the Dior Oblique motif – designed by Marc Bohan in 1967 – is specially designed to be fixed on the luggage rack, adding a distinctive allure. A helmet adorned with the same iconic motif rounds out the unique range.

Symbols of escape to new horizons, these limited-edition creations will launch in spring 2021 in Dior boutiques around the world and subsequently in a selection of Piaggio Group’s Motoplex stores. The accessories, including the helmet and top case, will be available exclusively in Dior boutiques.

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Dior

Meet Dior’s New Bobby Bag

Here comes your next It-bag. Presented first on the F/W 2020 runway, Dior unveils Dior Bobby, a new bag of timeless modernity and a subtle tribute to Christian Dior’s beloved pet dog. Another must-have piece created by Maria Grazia Chiuri because the simplicity in its design is precisely what makes this bag so versatile.

The Dior Bobby is a hobo style showcasing sophisticated lines and harmonious proportions.
It’s available in three sizes – small, medium, large – and in four colours – black, white, camel, and of course, the signature blue Dior Oblique canvas that is still all the rage in fashion. It has a flexible suede interior, and is enhanced by antique gold-finish metal hardware. Its removable and adjustable shoulder strap has a military-inspired buckle, and allows it to be carried on the shoulder or crossbody, as well as by hand.

In stores Mid July! So get yourself on the wait list now! I am going for the middle sized one in camel below. Isn’t it so pretty?

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Dior

A May Day Tradition – Lily of the Valley

Oh, how wonderful spring is! With its bees, flowers, sun and now finally rain, it is my favorite season. One tradition I truly adore is the gifting of lilies of the valley on the first of May as a symbol of springtime and to wish happiness which is very popular in France. In many countries, the first of May is also National Labor Day. As a result, it is a public holiday that we get to enjoy.

My first of May outfit: Lily of the valley-print pussy-bow silk blouse and Lily of the Valley-print pleated silk skirt, both by Valentino


iconLegend has it that the custom began on May 1, 1561 when King Charles IX received a sprig of the tiny flower as a token of good luck from knight Louis Girard. It is said that whoever finds a lily of the valley with 13 small bells will be particularly lucky.

The king liked the idea so much that he decided to start a tradition and presented a bouquet of lilies of the valley to each of the ladies of his court each year on the same day. And thus began the Fête du Muguet as it is called in France, or May Day.

Christian Dior dedicated his whole Spring 1954 collection to his favorite flower.

The lily of the valley was also Christian Dior’s favorite flower and one of his lucky charms. Faithful to tradition, he offered it each May 1st to all his petites mains and clients. Christian Dior so cherished this spring flower that his florist, Madame Dedeban, grew it for him year-round in a specially heated greenhouse!

The Dior Hommes Fall 2014 collections full of lily of the valley details.

Thus, summer or winter, he was never without a sprig of it in his buttonhole. He also kept some in a finely-wrought box in his pocket. During preparations for his fashion shows, he would ask his petites mains to sew some sprigs of lily of the valley into the hem of a sleeve or a dress. Being the talisman it was, he was also prone to pinning it to the underside of the lapel of the suits worn by his models.

The original Diorissimo bottle of 1956

His beloved flower was also present in his collections each season. He devoted an entire line to it for spring 1954, and, two years later, with Edmond Roudnitska, the couturier realized his dream of capturing its green and floral fragrance. And so, 1956 saw the launch of his third opus, Diorissimo, a triumph of olfactory prowess.

Dior Haute Couture S/S 2016

Lily of the valley has inspired the House’s perfumes and designs ever since, as it did the S/S 2016 haute couture collection. Sprigs of lily of the valley, traced out in beads and sequins, bloomed across a white Bar jacket, the result of over three hundred hours of embroidery.

Kirsten Dunst at the 69th Festival de Cannes in 2016

Later in 2016, at the 69th Festival de Cannes, Kirsten Dunst ascended the famous steps in a white silk gazar Dior haute couture dress embroidered with 300 lily of the valley flowers.

The famous dress Muguet from 1957 was on display at the amazing V&A exhibition «Christian Dior Designer of Dreams»

This special creation was inspired by the dress Muguet, designed by Christian Dior for his S/S 1957 collection in which the flower also blossomed on a dress named Mois de Mai.

Surprise for my daughter today: The beautiful Lucky scent engraved with her name and sign.

In 2018, the Maison launched Lucky as part of their Maison Christian Dior Collection – another fragrance that features lily of the valley, in combination with white flowers and ozonic notes. The nose behind is Francois Demachy, Parfumeur-Créateur Dior, who says:. “Christian Dior was very superstitious and would stitch a stem of lily of the valley into the seam of his dresses for good luck. I wanted to represent the perfume of this hidden lily of the valley, sewn into metres of silk, with a profusion of white flowers and freshness. The scent of his favourite flower gradually reveals itself. Lucky is a good luck charm and the perfume to wear whenever you want to cross your fingers.”

Dior’s new Lily of the Valley china is so beautiful, click here for more infos. 

And last but not least, a very sweet fairytale tells of the affection between the lily of the valley and a nightingale. Once upon a time, every night, the nightingale would come to the garden to sing. However, the lily of the valley was shy and hid herself from the bird. The nightingale was lonely and said he would no longer sing unless the lily of the valley revealed herself, and promised to bloom every May for all to see. And so she does.

LoL, Sandra

Photos: Courtesy of Dior, Giambattista Valli, Vogue and © Sandra Bauknecht
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Hôtel Plaza Athénée – A Couture Experience

Chic, stylish and fashion-loving, Hôtel Plaza Athénée in Paris has enjoyed a long love affair with Haute Couture. Favoured by fashionistas, the spirit of couture lives on throughout the hotel in every personalised, hand-tailored detail. The location itself couldn’t be more appropriate, located on the famous Avenue Montaigne, where a century of designers and artists have pursued boldness and passion. On the doorstep you’ll find all the big-name boutiques including Dior, Chanel, Louis Vuitton and Prada.

The House of Dior has a very special connection with the hotel. Back in 1946, Christian Dior opened his first boutique on Avenue Montaigne, inspired by the idea of attracting elegant customers. In homage to his love of the hotel, his collections included creations called Plaza and Athénée. The legendary Dior Bar suit was even inspired by the chic women who frequented the hotel’s bar. Continuing this long relationship, the spa is a Dior Institut decorated with fashion sketches by Christian Dior and photos of his fashion shoots at the hotel.

«Women, with their intuitive instinct, understood that I dreamed not only of making them more beautiful, but happier too.» – Christian Dior

All of the hotel’s beautifully crafted rooms and suites are amazing but if you are a true fashionista and would like to experience something very special, I recommend a stay at the Haute Couture Suite that is entirely dedicated to Dior, something that’s reflected in its signature grey and pink tones. Subtle details like a mannequin, Dior books and a chocolate treat in a fashionable form, all add to the unique appeal.

The history of Haute Couture speaks of its passions in the charming design of this silken suite. A classical French palace ambience fills the living room, bedroom, dressing and bathroom with a sense of splendour, elaborate moldings and silver-leaf detail.

Paris Fashion Week is undoubtedly among the highlights of the year and the Hôtel Plaza Athénée a great spot to stay. In any case, if if it is designer fashion shopping you’re after, well you know all the best boutiques are just a few steps away.

And very importantly if you travel to Paris, don’t forget to buy one of the must-have luxe travel pieces from the collaboration between Dior and Rimowa. This luggage is to-die-for and just hitting the shelves…

LoL, Sandra

Photos: Courtesy of Hôtel Plaza Athénée 

Rouge Dior for Halloween

Looking for some Halloween make-up inspiration? Here you go! Bella Hadid reveals her mischievous side for DIOR MAKE-UP with ROUGE DIOR for HALLOWEEN. A spellbinding look in tribute to the most emblematic House of DIOR colour.

Peter Philips, Creative and Image Director for DIOR MAKE-UP, audaciously celebrates red, the «colour of life» according to Mr. Christian Dior and creates a captivating make-up look that is both chic and enigmatic, that works for Halloween and for daily life.

With ardent lips dressed in striking red, glittering eyelids heightened with elegant eyeliner, and a velvet complexion sporting a vivid blush, Bella is transformed into a mesmerizing femme fatale. The Hitchcockian tension between her and the young man Ludwig Wildsdorff is captured by photographer Richard Burbridge.

LoL, Sandra

Photos © DIOR #DIORMAKEUPHALLOWEEN
@DIORMAKEUP @PETERPHILIPSMAKEUP @DIORBEAUTYLOVERS 

Visiting Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams

Already in April this year, I had the the pleasure to visit one of the most beautiful exhibitions ever, a must for every fashion lover: Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. This retrospective celebrates the founding couturier’s avant-garde spirit and the international destiny of his House, shepherded, after his passing in 1957, by the talent of the Creative Directors who succeeded him.

You still have one week left to indulge in the universe of the French Maison as the exhibition has been extended to September 1st after it sold out within 19 days of its opening.

ABOUT CHRISTIAN DIOR

Christian Dior was born into a wealthy Normandie family in the French seaside town of Granville on January 21, 1905. As a child he shared his mother’s love of gardens. is early passions included architecture and designing fancy dress costumes for his friends. Sent by his parents to study political science in Paris, Dior gravitated towards a bohemian group of friends, including composer Henri Sauguet and artist Christian Bérard.

In 1928, he opened and art gallery, but the business foundered when the Dior family fortune collapsed following the 1929 financial crisis. Forced to find a new way to make a living, Dior took up fashion drawing, eventually working with top couturiers Robert Piguet and Lucien Lelong.

In 1946, Dior founded his own couture house with the backing of textile manufacturer Marcel Boussac. On 12 February 1947, the House of Dior launched its first collection. Dubbed the «New Look» by the press, the collection had an instant and unparalleled influence on fashion around the world. The House of Dior grew rapidly. By 1955 it accounted for over 50% of overseas exports of French haute couture.

In the prime of his career, Christian Dior died suddenly on 24 October 1957. His legacy has continued under the creative directors who have succeeded him at the head of the House of Dior: Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Gianfranco Ferré, John Galliano, Raf Simons and Maria Grazia Chiuri.

THE EXHIBITION

Based on the highly successful Musée des Arts Décoratifs exhibition Christian Dior: Couturier du Rêve (on view from 5 July 2017 to 7 January 2018), the show charts seven decades of the continuing importance, influence and creativity of the House of Dior in the fashion world, with an additional section showcasing the story of Dior in Britain.

The famous «Bar Suit» and hat, Haute Couture S/S 1947

Drawn from the extensive Dior Archives, the exhibition presents over 500 objects, with over 200 rare Haute Couture garments shown alongside accessories, fashion photography, film, vintage perfume, original make-up, illustrations, magazines, and Christian Dior’s personal possessions. Unfolding across eleven themes, this unique event invites visitors to immerse themselves inside Christian Dior’s world, tracing the highlights of his life, from his childhood to the creation of his couture house at the end of 1946. A voyage through time that continues with the starring role played by such timeless icons as the eternal «Bar Suit», and legendary looks designed by the visionary tastemaker the couturier was.

Celebrating the Dior art of color, accessories, hats, bags, illustrations, miniature dresses, lipsticks and emblematic fragrances together form a spectrum of colors dear to Christian Dior and, in turn, enrich this exciting encounter with the House. The culmination of this immersive exploration, an exhibit called «Le Salon» showcases the splendor of society soirées, illustrated by spectacular dresses that testify to the virtuosity and savoir-faire of excellence of the Dior haute couture ateliers.

THE NEW LOOK

Christian Dior unveiled his first haute couture collection on 12 February 1947, amid excited anticipation within fashion circles. Offering a radical alternative to the boxy, masculine style of women’s fashion after the Second World War, Dior’s designs caused a sensation. Carmel Snow, editor in chief of Harper’s Bazaar, declared: « It’s quite a revolution, dear Christian, your dresses have such a new look!» The Dior Line showcases ten defining looks made between 1947 and 1957, Christian Dior’s own tenure at the House.

DIOR IN BRITAIN

Exactly to this day, 72 years before, on 26 August 1947, a small group of people stood together in London’s Claridge’s Hotel, hovering around a smartly dressed middle-aged man holding a trilby hat. The celebrated couturier Christian Dior, who just six months earlier had revolutionized fashion with its first «New Look» collection, was in the process of being ambushed by the press. One journalist grilled him as to how he was able to persuade a world short of fabric to embrace his audacious new fashions, to which Dior replied: «I am giving the women the dresses they want. They’re fed up with war restrictions… My full skirts are a release

«I adore the English, dressed not only in tweeds which suit them so well, but also in those flowing dresses, in subtle colours, which they have worn inimitably since the days of GainsboroughChristian Dior, 1957.

Christian Dior designed this couture dress in 1951 specially for the 2st birthday of Princess Margaret.

In his autobiography, Dior affirmed his love for all things English. He was particularly enamoured with the English aristocracy and he admired the grandeur of the great houses and gardens of Britain, as well as British-designed ocean liners, including the Queen Mary, and Savile Row suits.

HISTORICISM

Christian Dior often cited historic periods in his designs – the sinus lines of Belle Époque dresses from the late 1800s and early 1900s: the tightly waisted mid-nineteenth-century styles worn by the French Empress Eugénie, Napoléon III’s wife. The sumptuous silks and dramatic silhouettes of the eighteenth century held a particular fascination. Dior’s premises at 30 Avenue Montaigne in Paris had a neo-classical façade, medaillon-backed chairs, and white and grey panelling like that of Petit Trianon at Versailles, a colour Dior is said to have revived.

«I thank heaven I lived in Paris in the last years of the Belle EpoqueChristian Dior, 1957

In front of one of my favorite Dior dresses, Look 24 from the F/W 2004 Haute Couture collection by John Galliano.

TRAVEL

Travels explore how travel and different countries and cultures have consistently inspired the various designers at the House of Dior. This section focuses on five of the countries that provided a source of reference for Christian Dior and his successors at the House of Dior: Mexico, India, Egypt, Japan and China.

THE GARDEN

Flowers are emblematic of the Maison and have inspired silhouettes, embroidery and prints, but also the launch of Miss Dior in 1947, the first fragrance created alongside the very first show.
From horticulture to global travel and historicism, the show reveals the sources of inspiration that defined the House of Dior’s aesthetic.

Look 47 from the F/W 2012 Haute Couture collection by Raf Simons for Dior. It was worn by actress Natalie Portman, the face of Miss Dior perfume.

DESIGNERS FOR DIOR

Designers for Dior spotlights the work of the subsequent six key artistic directors since Christian Dior’s death in 1957.

Since 1957 the House of Dior has been led by:
Yves Saint Laurent 1958-60
Marc Bohan 1960-89
Gianfranco Ferré 1989-96
John Galliano 1996-2011 
Raf Simons 
2012-15
Maria Grazia Chiuri 2016 to present
Each creative director has brought a new perspective.

THE ATELIERS

The Ateliers showcases toiles from the Dior Ateliers in a stunning «cabinet of curiosity» style.

«Everything created by human hands expresses something – above all the personality of the creator. The same thing is true with a dress. But since so many people are working on it, the real job is to get all the hands that cut, sew, try on and embroider to express all I have feltChristian Dior, 1954

DIORAMA

Diorama examines the breadth of the House of Dior, from accessories including costume jewellery, hats, shoes and bags, to illustrations, miniature dresses and archive lipstick and perfume, bottles, collected in a kaleidoscopic display. This section spotlights the key creative partners of the House from the past 70 years, including Roger Vivier Stephen Jones, René Gruau, Serge Lutens and Swarovski, Christian Dior’s first choice for crystals to embellish his creations.

How cool! My own outfit was part of the exhibition.

THE BALLROOM

Drawing on his love of costume, it was in his evening dresses and ball gowns that Dior could indulge his imagination and showcase the diverse skills of the haute couture ateliers. Until today, a Dior gown, synonymous with allure and opulence, demonstrates the formidable talents and techniques of Parisian haute couture. It is no wonder that such striking creations have graced numerous red carpets as the choice of film stars and prominent personalities over the past seven decades.

I hope that you have enjoyed following me on my tour through this beautiful exhibition.

LoL, Sandra

Photos taken of the exhibition: © Sandra Bauknecht

Dior Rose Céleste

«Women, with their intuitive instinct, understood that I dreamed not only of making them more beautiful, but happier too.» – Christian Dior

Victoire de Castellane continues the story of DIOR‘s «Rose des vents» collection with a new celestial lucky charm, so-called «Rose Céleste». A twist of grains encircles the medallion, which turns to switch between the moon and sun sides.

On the front, a mother-of-pearl moon and three small white gold stars have been embedded with infinite care in an onyx disc in order to reveal all their brilliance.

On the reverse, a majestic yellow gold sun, with nine rays of different sizes, stands out from the mother-of-pearl background. Its almond-shaped eye and its smile were defined with a subtle level of refinement. The ornamental stones have been polished to give them a rounded surface, while the gold that encircles them has been shaped to form a rice-grain effect.

Taking its inspiration from Christian Dior‘s highly superstitious nature and his passion for astrology, the new must-have jewellery pieces are available as a medallion, bracelet or necklace, these talismans offer a new invitation to travel through the Dior’s rich heritage, by day and by night.

Bracelet DIOR Rose Céleste €1900
Necklace DIOR Rose Céleste €2000
Médaillon DIOR Rose Céleste €4500

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Dior

Astro Dior

Yesterday, I spotted the new jewelry collection by DIOR Joaillerie at the Zurich boutique and fell immediately in love. Named ASTRO DIOR, it is a celebration of the superstitious character of Christian Dior and consists of 12 necklaces in gold and mother of pearl, allowing you to now wear your astrological sign.

Christian Dior at a feast of St. Catherine, circa 1950

Christian Dior loved astrology. Therefore he visited Madame Delahaye, his clairvoyant, before opening his eponymous Maison in 1946. After the consultation, she confirmed to him that the launch of his brand was written in the stars.

Over the years, many references to the designer’s beliefs in astrology and mysticism appeared as he created certain pieces with a nickname deriving from those fields: Bonne étoile (lucky star), Horoscope, Tour de cartes (card trick) and Cartomancienne (cartomancer).

Astrological references on the DIOR runways

The House’s creative director Maria Grazia Chiuri continued this legacy by embroidering zodiac signs and celestial motifs on cashmere sweaters, bags and more.

Making of ASTRO DIOR 

Victoire de Castellane also celebrates this fascination with astrology now with the launch of these beautiful 12 necklaces that are available in stores now.

LoL, Sandra

ASTRO DIOR – Aries

ASTRO DIOR – Taurus

ASTRO DIOR – Gemini

ASTRO DIOR – Cancer

ASTRO DIOR – Leo

ASTRO DIOR – Viergo

ASTRO DIOR – Libra

ASTRO DIOR – Scorpio

ASTRO DIOR – Sagittarius

ASTRO DIOR – Capricorn

ASTRO DIOR – Aquarius

ASTRO DIOR – Pisces

 Photos: Courtesy of DIOR and © Sandra Bauknecht