Louis Vuitton x Fornasetti for F/W 2021

This week, Nicolas Ghesquière sent the models mingling with ancient Roman, Greek, and Etruscan sculptures to the tunes of Daft Punk’s mega-hit «Around the World» down the Louvre’s Denon wing for his Louis Vuitton F/W 2021 show without an audience due to the current pandemic.

The press release stated: «There’s no need to venture far to create the impression of traveling. It’s enough to reach far back… to the Golden Age, or Age of Enlightenment, eras that forged the essence of our civilization. Everything is expressed so purely in Greco-Roman antiquity, the acme of an aesthetic whose primacy is uncontested. More than a journey, Louis Vuitton embarks on an odyssey with a F/W 2021 collection that incorporates fabulous drawings by Fornasetti, the delicate, fanciful engravings of an enduring era. His imaginative strokes explore, illustrate and impart style. It’s also a story of conquest — of body, heart and mind — in which humankind takes centre stage, in all its functional elegance, intellectual dominance, and earthly seduction. The astonishment of age-old principles endures and continues to guide us, such as contrapposto, a stance that first appeared in the 6th century BC and lent statues a dynamic allure, which countless couture poses have reprised since and still denotes a certain stylistic tension in fashion.»

I absolutely loved how Louis Vuitton’s Artistic Director of Women’s collections Nicolas Ghesquière has explored the unique creative world of renowned Italian artistic design atelier Fornasetti for the Maison’s F/W 2021 collection. The multifaceted collection showcases Fornasetti’s iconic hand-drawn imagery that has enchanted art and design lovers since Piero founded his atelier in 1940.

The collaboration begins with Nicolas Ghesquière’s F/W 2021 collection which integrates Fornasetti’s distinct visual universe into multiple designs. Unveiled in the spectacular setting of the Michelangelo and Daru Galleries in the Louvre, the collection with its Fornasetti images of antiquity builds a time-travelling aesthetic and creative dialogue with the museum’s remarkable array of Greek, Etruscan and Roman sculpture.

The collaborative designs in the F/W 2021 collection feature specific Fornasetti themes and artworks, selected by Nicolas Ghesquière in dialogue with Barnaba Fornasetti, the Artistic Director of the Fornasetti atelier, and their teams, from the 13,000-piece Fornasetti archive in Milan. These clothes and accessories use a rich combination of colours, textures and traditional, cutting-edge techniques including jacquard, embroidery and laser printing, intertwining Fornasetti’s exquisitely illustrated world with Nicolas Ghesquière’s strikingly contemporary design.

Highlights include velvet dresses, shiny printed jersey tops upon which Fornasetti drawings of ancient statues are overlaid on high-tech thermal-camera imagery, as well as fleece hooded jackets and tailoring pieces. Oversize outerwear pieces feature Fornasetti print both in a stamp inspired coloured version and, in a gold, coated version.

The show collection will be followed by a wider Louis Vuitton-Fornasetti capsule collection to be launched at a later date featuring a broader selection of Louis Vuitton products that draw on Fornasetti motifs, such as buildings, locks, keys and portraits. These include a captivating version of the Cannes bag in transformed leather, beautifully embellished with a Fornasetti black-and-white architectural drawing and reminiscent of the Renaissance-era Baptistery in Florence, and a reworked Petite Malle that seems to have been inflated and covered with a dome printed metallic leather, creating a striking optical illusion.

«With this collaboration, I wanted to use the pieces to evoke the continuing modernity of Fornasetti’s artistic world,» says Nicolas Ghesquière. «Fornasetti’s enduring body of work is the realisation of a remarkable hand-drawn technique and magical take on the world, and I am particularly drawn to the way Fornasetti re-explored and reworked the heritage of classicism and ancient Rome, adding new references to historical imagery. As a designer who has always loved fashion’s ability to evoke the past, present and future simultaneously, I wanted to add new layers to this creative palimpsest. Exploring the Fornasetti archives had the excitement of an archaeological dig, searching for and finding drawings from the past to give them a new life for Louis Vuitton – for now and the future

«My father was an innovator who believed in the handmade, just like Louis Vuitton,» says Barnaba Fornasetti, son of Piero Fornasetti, and the brand’s artistic director. «Our vision has always been to bring Fornasetti’s unique artistic imagination to people through beautifully crafted objects, and this rewarding collaboration represents a new opportunity to expand and explore its visual creativity

In all its facets, the Louis Vuitton-Fornasetti collaboration embodies the two Houses’ shared sense of experimental traditionalism: an effective blend of Louis Vuitton’s forward-looking creativity and craft and Fornasetti’s magical and visionary depiction of the world.

Personally speaking, I absolutely love it! Finally, a collection with creativity behind it. Something that has been missing lately…

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Louis Vuitton
DISCLOSURE: This post is NOT sponsored. I am just loving it!

Gabriela Hearst’s First Chloé Collection

Personally speaking, it was THE show of Paris Fashion Week that I have been eagerly waiting for: Gabriela Hearst’s first collection for Chloé.

Hearst called her first collection for the French Maison the «Aphrodite» to her own brand’s «Athena». Chloé in Greek means «blooming». The question is if it is a new bloom for the Maison with Hearst at the helm. It definitely is in terms of sustainability and this key word was Hearst’s approach to Chloé’s F/W 2021 collection: sustainability was her inspiration, her technique, her fabrics and even her volumes.

The Uruguayan-American designer claimed in the press release that Chloé’s F/W 2021 collection could be considered «four times more sustainable compared to last year,» and she explained that she got there by «eliminating virgin synthetic fiber (polyester) or artificial cellulosic fiber (viscose) and sourcing recycled, reused and organic denim,» adding that «more than 50% of the silk comes from organic agriculture and more than 80% of cashmere yarn for knitwear is recycled

This earthy point of view is also something Hearst is known for at her own eponymous brand. For me, I had to look at the collection many times until it has started to warm up to me. You have to understand it to like it as there is not something really excitingly new for the eye, but for your consciousness. I can see the DNA of both brands. However, it is missing this romantic, bohemian playfulness I have always loved at Chloé, even that Hearst only sent dresses down the digital runway.

Gabriela Hearst presented the last look herself.

My favorite item was the coat Gabriela wore for the finale of the show, along with the eco-leather dresses and the printed puffer coats. Hearst created them by repurposing from Chloé overstock spanning designers and eras, with Sheltersuit, a nonprofit organization providing aid to the homeless, which also collaborated on a series of backpacks. The marble prints on blouses and dresses had been created by the artist Peter Miles using seaweed and eggs.

The show was presented digitally last week on March 3rd, one hundred years to the day of founder Gaby Aghion’s birth. Both Gaby and Gabi, as is Hearst’s nickname too, are two strong fashion designers that interpret femininity in their own independent way and respective generations. It is surely a very viable wardrobe with lots of investment pieces to last for a very long time. As Hearst noted to Gaby in a statement, «your House is in good hands» – I would sign that! At least she made me start to re-think the state of fashion today.

LoL, Sandra

The rebirth of Chloé’s Edith bag by Gabriela Hearst.

Photos: © Chloé