Prada’s Seventh Drop of New Timecapsule

On July 1st, 2021 the monthly Prada Timecapsule drop will be launched on prada.com – at 3pm CET – for 24 hours only. Launched for the first time on December 5, 2019 in Europe, Prada Timecapsule presents a new item on the first Thursday of every month, an online exclusive for just 24 hours.

Topical hues and vibrant color contrasts define the pop-inspired graphic pattern of the new Timecapsule shirt, decorated with an all-over animal pattern and a tiger motif at the back. Faded and irregular along the edges, the placed print creates a distinctive, vintage look, emphasizing each piece’s uniqueness. The triangle logo is reworked in a rubber detail. Available exclusively online for just 24 hours, the garment is decorated with a special logo created by OMA, the architecture firm founded by Rem Koolhaas, and with a serial number that makes it unique.

TECHNICAL DETAILS
Oversized – Short sleeves – Bowling collar – Breast pocket – Straight hem – Mother-of-pearl buttons – Rubber triangle logo on the front pocket – 100% Cotton – Sizes (XS, S, M, L, XL). Made In Italy. Price: CHF 950.

Next drop will be on August 5th, 2021.

LoL, Sandra

 Photos: © Prada

Prada’s Sixth Drop of New Timecapsule

On June 3th, 2021 the monthly Prada Timecapsule drop will be launched on prada.com – at 3pm CET – for 24 hours only. Launched for the first time on December 5, 2019 in Europe, Prada Timecapsule presents a new item on the first Thursday of every month, an online exclusive for just 24 hours.

Tropical vibes and dynamic lines juxtapose in a bold graphic pattern for the new drop of Timecapsule, reinterpreting Prada’s iconic «Ibiscus» print. Vivid hues and chromatic contrasts add a contemporary accent to the vintage inspired bowling shirt. Available exclusively online for 24 hours only, the eighteenth drop of Prada Timecapsule features a serial number that makes it unique, for both women and men.

A special logo created by OMA, the architectural studio founded by Rem Koolhaas, together with a serial number and sophisticated dedicated packaging, makes each drop unique.

TECHNICAL DETAILS
Oversized – Short sleeves – Bowling collar – Breast pocket – Straight hem – Mother-of-pearl buttons – 100% Cotton – Sizes (XS, S, M, L, XL). Made In Italy. Price: CHF 950.

Next drop will be on July 1st, 2021.

LoL, Sandra

Photos: © Prada

Tiffany & Co. Acquires an 80-Carat Diamond

Breaking news for all gem lovers. Tiffany & Co. acquires an exceptional 80-carat diamond to reimagine its historic 1939 World’s Fair Necklace. Expected to be its most expensive piece ever, Tiffany will unveil the diamond necklace in 2022 when the doors of its transformed Fifth Avenue flagship store reopen, making history once again, just as the original necklace did nearly a century ago when it debuted at the World’s Fair in Queens, New York.

In August 2020, OMA unveiled images of the newly transformed Tiffany Fifth Avenue Flagship Store to open in 2022.

The original aquamarine design has been modernized with an extraordinary oval diamond of over 80 carats, the largest diamond ever offered by Tiffany and eclipsed only by the Tiffany Diamond, which famously is not for sale.

«What better way to mark the opening of our transformed Tiffany flagship store in 2022 than to reimagine this incredible necklace from the 1939 World’s Fair, one of our most celebrated pieces when we opened our doors on 57th Street and Fifth Avenue for the first time,» said Victoria Reynolds, Tiffany & Co. Chief Gemologist. «The new necklace perfectly reflects our brand heritage as a New York luxury jeweler, whose founder was known as the ‘King of Diamonds‘.»

Tiffany & Co. 80-carat, D color, internally flawless diamond inspired by necklace from the 1939 World’s Fair.

The breathtaking center stone – an over-80-carat, D color, internally flawless oval diamond – is not only very rare, it is a symbol of Tiffany’s industry-first approach to diamond traceability. Responsibly sourced in Botswana, Africa, the diamond will be set by Tiffany artisans in NYC.


Photograph of the aquamarine and diamond necklace from the 1939 World’s Fair_Tiffany & Co. Archives.

The original necklace’s sizable aquamarine and exceptional diamond forms entranced the millions who came to admire the international spectacle. With its forward-looking theme, «Dawn of a New Day,» the 1939 World’s Fair promised a glimpse into «the World of Tomorrow.» The fair’s intention was to inspire, in its over 44 million visitors, the dream of a better and more effervescent tomorrow. Tiffany’s masterpiece did just that – setting the stage for the opening of its iconic flagship store on 57th Street and Fifth Avenue the following year, in 1940 – foreshadowing what will be a similarly historic moment for the brand in 2022.

In 1878, the company purchased the famous Tiffany Diamond, an immense canary yellow stone from the new South African deposits. Once cut, the diamond weighed 128.54 carats.

Tiffany has acquired many rare and remarkable gemstones for its jewelry designs in its 183-year history, including the legendary Tiffany Diamond, one of the world’s largest and finest fancy yellow diamonds, as well as the Hooker Emerald, now exhibited at the Smithsonian and the Mazarin Diamonds, purchased by Tiffany at the auction of the French Crown Jewels.

LoL, Sandra

The massive 75.47-carat Hooker Emerald had been auctioned to Tiffany & Co, which initially set it in a tiara. Despite its beauty, the tiara remained unsold for decades. In 1950, the emerald was re-set into a brooch that included matching earrings. Five years later, the brooch was purchased by Janet Annenberg Hooker. In 1977, she donated it to the Smithsonian.

Photos: © Tiffany & Co. and © OMA

Being Modern: MoMA in Paris

Great news for all lovers of art. The Museum of Modern Art and Fondation Louis Vuitton announce the exhibition “Being modern: MoMA in Paris” taking place from 11 October 2017 to 5 March 2018.

Fondation Louis Vuitton presents, in its Frank Gehry-designed building, an exceptional exhibition devoted to the unrivaled collection of the Museum of Modern Art. Featuring more than 200 renowned masterpieces and less familiar, but highly significant works. This exhibition highlights the pivotal role that MoMA, its curators and its exhibition program have played in the history of art in the 20th and 21st Centuries, ranging from the birth of modern art through trends and styles such as American abstraction, Pop art and Minimalism to the most contemporary art.

Now engaged in a significant expansion and renovation of its building, MoMA has chosen Fondation Louis Vuitton as its partner to bring its legendary artistic heritage to Paris, showcasing its mission to be perpetually modern.

Bernard Arnault, President of Fondation Louis Vuitton says:
“I wanted Being Modern: MoMA in Paris to fall within the tradition of our previous major exhibitions such as Keys to a Passion, 2015, and Icons of Modern Art, The Shchukin Collection, 2016. All three have been organised in close collaboration with some of the world’s most prestigious international modern art museums. This exhibition marks, once again, our desire to provide the widest possible audience with the opportunity to engage with some of the world’s most remarkable works of art.”


Paul Signac (French, 1863–1935) Opus 217.
Against the Enamel of a Background Rhythmic with Beats and Angles, Tones, and Tints, Portrait of M. Félix Fénéon in 1890 1890
Oil on canvas (73.5 x 92.5 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Fractional gift of Mr. and Mrs. David Rockefeller.
© 2017 Artists Rights

Among the 200 works presented at Fondation Louis Vuitton are masterpieces by Paul Cézanne, Gustav Klimt, Paul Signac, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Giorgio de Chirico, Edward Hopper, Max Beckmann, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Marcel Duchamp, Francis Picabia, Alexander Calder, René Magritte, Walker Evans, Yayoi Kusama, Willem de Kooning, Jasper Johns, Yvonne Rainer and Frank Stella.

Constantin Brancusi (French, born Romania. 1876–1957) Bird in Space 1928
Bronze (137.2 x 21.6 x 16.5 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Given anonymously, 1934.
© 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

Some of the works will be shown in France for the first time: Constantin Brancusi’s bronze Bird in Space (1928) (see above); Diane Arbus’s Identical Twins, Roselle, New Jersey (1967); Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans (1962); Philip Guston’s Tomb (1978); (Untitled) “USA Today” by Felix Gonzalez-Torres (1990); 144 Lead Square by Carl Andre (1969); Untitled by Christopher Wool (1990); Untitled (You Invest in the Divinity of the Masterpiece) by Barbara Kruger (1982); and Patchwork Quilt by Romare Bearden (1970).

Enjoy some first impressions of the exhibition in this post. To book your ticket, click here please.

LoL, Sandra

Bruce Nauman (American, born 1941) Human/Need/Desire 1983
Neon tubing and wire with glass tubing suspension frames (239.8 x 179 x 65.4 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Emily and Jerry Spiegel, 1991
© 2017 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Cindy Sherman (American, born 1954) Untitled Film Still #21 1978
Gelatin silver print (19.1 x 24.1 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Horace W. Goldsmith Fund through Robert B. Menschel, 1995 © 2017 Cindy Sherman

Ellsworth Kelly (American, 1923–2015) Colors for a Large Wall 1951
Oil on canvas, sixty-four panels (240 x 240 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Gift of the artist, 1969.
© 2017 Ellsworth Kelly


OMA (Office for Metropolitan Architecture) Welfare Palace Hotel Project, Roosevelt Island, New York, New York 1976
Gouache on paper (129.5 x 102.9 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Gift of The Howard Gilman Foundation, 2000.
© 2017 Rem Koolhaas

Shigetaka Kurita (Japanese, born 1972) for NTT DOCOMO, Inc., Japan, est. 1991 Emoji 1998-1999
Digital image dimensions variable
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Gift of NTT DOCOMO, Inc., 2016.
© 2017 NTT DOCOMO


Rirkrit Tiravanija (Thai, born Argentina 1961) untitled (the days of this society is numbered / December 7, 2012) 2014
Synthetic polymer paint and newspaper on linen (221 x 214.6 cm)
The Museum of Modern Art, New York Committee on Drawings and Prints Fund, 2014.
© 2017 Rirkrit Tiravanija

Photos: Courtesy of Louis Vuitton